boating-how-to
BOATING HOW TO

Below our tips and tricks to help you get the most out of your boating experience.

HOW TO CHOOSE A LIFE VEST

While all of our rentals do include life jackets for you and all of your boating crew you can always bring your own if you would like. If you need some help determining what life jacket is best for you we have put together a helpful little How To article below.

Type I Life Jacket – Inherently Buoyant

Intended Use:
Use this life jacket when cruising, racing and fishing offshore, or when boating alone, or in stormy conditions.

 

Minimum Buoyancy:
22 lbs. for adults. (11 lbs. for child size)

 

Pros:
• This life jacket is ideal for open, rough or remote water where rescue may be slow to arrive.

 

• Will turn MOST unconscious wearers face-up in water.

 

• Retains body heat, as it has additional foam and fabric, and keeps your head higher above water.

 

Cons:
• Bulky and uncomfortable.

 

• Not available to the general public.

Type II Life Jacket – Inherently Buoyant

Intended Use:

Inland day cruising, fishing and sailing. Good for boating in light craft.

 

Minimum Buoyancy:
15.5 lbs. for adult size.

 

Pros:
• Ideal for protected, inland water near shore, where chances of immediate rescue is good.

• Will turn SOME unconscious wearers face-up in water.

 

 

Cons:
• Not suitable for extended survival in rough water.

• Poor performer in rough water, often requires you to tread water in order to keep your head above water.

Type II – Inflatable

Intended Use:

For serious inland and near shore cruising.

 

Minimum Buoyancy:
34 lbs. for adult size.

 

Pros:
• Very comfortable.

• More buoyant than Type II Inherently Buoyant jackets.

 

Cons:
• Expensive

• Not guaranteed to turn unconscious wearer face-up.

Type III – Inherently Buoyant

 

Intended Use:

Supervised activities, such as water skiing, fishing, canoeing, kayaking and during personal watercraft operation.

 

Minimum Buoyancy:
15.5 lbs. for adult size.

 

Pros:
• Ideal for protected, inland water near shore, where chance of immediate rescue is good. Such as most Colorado lakes.

• Very comfortable.

 

Cons:
• Not suitable for extended survival in rough water.

• Not designed to turn unconscious people face up in water.

Type IV – Throwable Device

 

Intended Use:

A Type IV is designed to be thrown to an overboard victim or to supplement the buoyancy of a person overboard. It is not to be worn. Minimum buoyancy: 16.5 lbs. for ring buoy or 18 lbs. for boat cushion.

 

NOTE
Type IV devices must be IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE for use. You must have one at arm’s length to throw over the side in an emergency. Having one in a locker under the driver’s seat isn’t considered “immediately available.”

 

All of our rentals come equipped with a Type IV device.

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